Photographic images fused/slumped/cast in glass

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Photographic images fused/slumped/cast in glass

Postby wendy » Sun Nov 02, 2003 3:50 am

I am a glass student from London looking to fuse photographic images onto glass and then slump them afterwards.

Would also like to kiln cast shreds of images placed in with glass in open moulds.

Someone told me there is a method called 'laser trans' but I can't find anything.

Does anyone know about this or other methods please?

Thanks for helping!

Wendy.
wendy
 

Postby lissa » Sun Nov 02, 2003 9:40 am

There is currently a thread running about this, check it out and see if some of the info. and links are helpful.

http://www.warmglass.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=2751&sid=0d5097233945d19dd6ba3a420913cb46

lissa.
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Re: Photographic images fused/slumped/cast in glass

Postby PDXBarbara » Sun Nov 02, 2003 1:46 pm

wendy wrote:
Someone told me there is a method called 'laser trans' but I can't find anything.

Wendy.


Hi Wendy... check out this URL. It's an intriguing material.
http://www.lazertran.com/
Hope this helps.

Barbara
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Postby Wallace Venable » Mon Nov 03, 2003 3:28 pm

The site you listed has some very interesting wrinkles on decal applications.

I have purchased decal paper from MicroMark (http://www.micromark.com) and BelDecal (http://www.beldecal.com/)
both of which sell retail quantities on line.
Wally Venable, Student of glass
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Postby PDXBarbara » Mon Nov 03, 2003 3:49 pm

Hi Wally,
I tried to send you a private message thru this board on September 10, in response to your post about your xerography process & corning class. It's still sitting in my outbox, so I suppose you haven't logged on ot get your private messages. I'd send it to you via email, but don't know your address. Who knows, maybe the message is simply stuck in my outbox!
oh well.
Barbara
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Postby Wallace Venable » Tue Nov 04, 2003 1:48 pm

Barb: Didn't get it. Replied to you yesterday by clicking on "email" and got my copy. Problem with your email? Hadn't caught on to "private messages" feature. Will try that.
Wally Venable, Student of glass
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Postby PDXBarbara » Tue Nov 04, 2003 3:17 pm

Hi Wally... got your email & replying to your email address!
BB
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Postby Joseph Tracy » Thu Nov 06, 2003 12:28 pm

It is unclear from the threads I followed how Mary Van Cline gets her photos onto glass, and whether they are fused into the glass or appliqued with an emulsion , after all, photographs were originally exposed on glass plates coated with light sensitive emulsion. The decal methods mentioned are unsuitable for fusing, unless you get a custom made ceramic decal. I have fused painted work with good success( http://www.brooksideglassworks.com/BROO ... ge_19.html ) and have silkscreened glass paint with good results also( there are several good recent threads on the topic of silkscreening).

Right now I think the best bet is good quality silk screening, prhaps combined with traditional glass painting techniques for grey areas and touch up.

Somebody will eventually adapt a large Iris type professional inkjet printer
to be able to use glass enamels or fusible powders.

One other method that has some possibilities and is cheap to explore is a kind of paper lithography which uses copier prints. Basically, you coat the
copy paper (with the photo copy image on it )with a brushcoat of liquid gum arabic. Then you apply glasspaint which has been thoroughly bended into printers oil with a brayer evenly coated with the pigmented oil. The oil sticks to the oily toner on the photocopy and not to the watery arabic. You then kind of mop up the excess ink by first squueezing some more arabic onto it and then sponging it . The photocopy image is placed inkside down on the piece of glass, covered with some absorbent paper, brayered, and then peeled back carefully. The detail possible is stunning but tonality tends to be fainter than I like. However I have not pursued it and there may be variations on the idea that would make it more effective and adaptable.
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